Miele DG 5061 manual

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  • Brand: Miele
  • Product: Oven
  • Model/name: DG 5061
  • Filetype: PDF
  • Available languages: English, French, Dutch, German

Table of Contents

Page: 0
User instructions
Steam ovens
M.-Nr. 07 217 800
en - AU, NZ
Page: 1
Foreword. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
The advantages of cooking with steam . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
General notes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
Cooking containers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
Your own containers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
Condensate tray . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
Shelf levels . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
Frozen food. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
Temperature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
Cooking duration (time) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
Cooking with liquid . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
Your own recipes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
Vegetables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
Meat. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
Fish . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
Other foods. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
Shellfish . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
Mussels . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
Rice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
Pasta . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
Dumplings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
Grains . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
Dried pulses. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
Hen's eggs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
Fruit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24
Menu cooking. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25
Defrosting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27
Reheat . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30
Bottling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32
Contents
2
Page: 2
Extracting juice with steam. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34
Special programmes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35
Preparing yoghurt . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35
Proving dough . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36
Melting gelatine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36
Melting chocolate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37
Skinning vegetables and fruit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38
Apple storage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39
Blanching. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39
Steaming onions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40
Bacon. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40
Disinfecting containers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41
Heating flannels . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41
Decrystallising honey. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42
Contents
3
Page: 3
Please read through the operating instructions carefully to
help you familiarise yourself with the appliance and also for
information on how to use the different functions.
The advantages of cooking with steam
Almost all vitamins and minerals are retained as the food is
not immersed in water.
Cooking with steam also retains the true taste of the food
better than conventional cooking. We therefore recommend
seasoning the food after it has been cooked. Food retains its
fresh, orginal colour.
General notes
This section contains general information about steam
cooking. You will find more detailed information about
particular foods and how to cook them in the other sections.
Cooking containers
This steam oven is supplied with stainless steel cooking
containers.
Other containers, in a variety of sizes, both perforated and
solid, are available as optional extras (please refer to
"Optional accessories" in the operating instructions supplied
with the appliance). This enables you to choose the most
suitable container for the food you are preparing.
It is best to use perforated containers if possible. The steam
can reach the food from all sides and the food is cooked
evenly.
Foreword
4
Page: 4
Your own containers
You can also use your own containers. However, please note
the following:
– If using plastic cooking containers, make sure that they are
heat-resistant to 100 °C and able to withstand hot steam.
With plastic containers please check with the manufacturer
that they are suitable for use in a steam oven.
– Thick-sided containers made from porcelain, china or
stoneware, for example, are not so suitable for steam
cooking. They do not conduct heat well and as a result
cooking durations will be considerably longer than those
given in the charts.
– Place the cooking containers on the rack and not on the
oven floor.
– Ensure that there is a gap of at least 3 cm between the
upper rim of the container and the top of the cooking
compartment to allow sufficient steam into the container.
Condensate tray
When you are using perforated containers, place the
condensate tray on the floor of the appliance to collect any
drops of liquid and allow them to be removed easily.
Shelf levels
You can select any shelf level. You can also cook on several
levels at the same time. This will not alter the cooking
duration.
Frozen food
Do not place more than 1.5 kg of frozen food in the appliance
at a time. The greater the quantity of frozen food, the longer
the heating up phase.
Foreword
5
Page: 5
Temperature
A maximum temperature of 100 °C is reached in the steam
oven. Most types of food will cook at this temperature. Some
more delicate types of food, such as soft fruit, must be
cooked at lower temperatures as otherwise they will burst.
More information is given in the relevant section.
Cooking duration (time)
In general, the cooking durations for cooking with steam are
the same as for cooking food in a saucepan. More
information about any factors which may affect the cooking
duration is given in the relevant sections.
The quantity of food does not affect the cooking duration.
1 kg of potatoes will take the same time to cook as 500 g.
The durations given in the charts are guidelines only. We
recommend selecting the shorter cooking duration quoted to
start with. If food is not cooked sufficiently after the shorter
time it can be put back in the oven and cooked some more.
Cooking with liquid
When cooking with liquid only fill the cooking container 2
/3 full
to prevent the liquid spilling when the cooking container is
removed from the oven.
Your own recipes
Food and recipes which are prepared in pot or a pan can
also be cooked in the steam oven. The cooking times in the
steam oven will be the same. Please note that food will not be
brown or crisp when cooking with steam.
Foreword
6
Page: 6
Fresh vegetables
Prepare fresh vegetables in the usual way, i.e. wash, clean
and cut them up.
Frozen vegetables
Frozen vegetables do not need to be defrosted before
steaming unless they have been frozen together in a block.
Frozen and fresh vegetables which take the same length of
time to cook can be cooked together.
If vegetables have frozen together in clumps, break these up
before cooking with steam. Follow the manufacturer's
instructions on the packaging regarding cooking duration.
Cooking containers
Food such as peas or asparagus spears, which have little or
no space between them will take longer to cook because the
steam has less space to work in. For an even result, it is best
to use a shallow container for these types of foods, and only
fill it 3-5 cm deep. When cooking large quantities divide the
food between 2 or 3 shallow cooking containers rather than
using one deep one.
Different types of vegetables which take the same length of
time to cook can be cooked together.
Use solid containers for vegetables which are cooked in
liquid such as cabbage.
Shelf levels
When cooking vegetables with a distinctive colour (e.g.
beetroot) in a perforated container at the same time as
cooking other foods in other containers, place the
condensate tray directly underneath the container with the
beetroot to catch any drips and so avoid any colour transfer.
Temperature
Vegetables are steamed at 100 °C.
Vegetables
7
Page: 7
Cooking duration
As with conventional methods, when cooking vegetables with
steam the cooking duration will depend on the size and also
whether you want the vegetables to be al dente or soft/well
done. Example:
waxy potatoes, cut into quarters = approx. 18 minutes
waxy potatoes, cut in half = approx. 22 minutes
Brussels sprouts, large, al dente = approx. 12 minutes
Brussels sprouts, small, soft = approx. 12 minutes
Vegetables
8
Page: 8
Settings
The durations given in the chart are guidelines for fresh vegetables. We
recommend selecting the shorter cooking duration quoted. If food is not cooked
sufficiently after the shorter time it can be put back in the oven and cooked some
more.
Temperature in °C Duration in minutes
Artichokes 100 35 - 40
Cauliflower, whole 100 20 - 45
Cauliflower florets 100 6 - 10
Green beans 100 8 - 12
Broccoli florets 100 4 - 8
Chicory 100 3 - 5
Chinese cabbage 100 4 - 6
Peas 100 3 - 8
Sugar snap peas 100 3 - 8
Fennel, halved 100 12 - 16
Fennel, cut into strips 100 6 - 10
Curly kale, chopped 100 20 - 30
Carrots, sliced 100 6 - 10
Potatoes, peeled and halved 100 20 - 40
Kohlrabi, cut into batons 100 6 - 10
Pumpkin, diced 100 3 - 6
Corn on the cob 100 10 - 25
Swiss chard 100 2 - 6
Peppers, cut into strips 100 2 - 6
New potatoes 100 25 - 40
Vegetables
9
Page: 9
Temperature in °C Duration in minutes
Leeks, sliced 100 4 - 8
Leeks, halved lengthwise 100 8 - 12
Romanesco, whole 100 15 - 30
Romanesco florets 100 6 - 10
Brussels sprouts 100 12 - 16
Beetroot, whole 100 40 - 50
Red cabbage, chopped 100 20 - 30
Black salsify, whole 1 cm thick 100 8 - 12
Celeriac, cut into batons 100 8 - 10
White asparagus 100 10 - 16
Green asparagus 100 7 - 12
Spinach 100 2 - 4
Spring cabbage, chopped 100 8 - 10
Celery stalks 100 7 - 10
Swede, batons/diced 100 7 - 12
White cabbage, chopped 100 15 - 20
Savoy cabbage, chopped 100 6 - 10
Courgettes, sliced 100 2 - 4
Vegetables
10
Page: 10
Fresh meat
Prepare the meat in the usual way.
Frozen meat
Meat should be thoroughly defrosted cooking in the steam
oven (see "Defrosting").
Preparation
For meat which needs to be seared before being cooked,
e.g. stewing steak, sear the meat in a pan on the hob first.
Then place it in the oven to cook it with steam.
Cooking container
Any.
Shelf level
Any.
Temperature
Meat is cooked in the steam oven at 100 °C.
Cooking duration
The cooking duration depends on the thickness and
tenderness of the meat, and not on the weight. The thicker
the food, the longer the cooking duration. A piece of meat
weighing 500 g which is 10 cm thick will take longer to cook
than a piece of meat weighing 500 g but which is 5 cm thick.
Useful tips
Use a perforated container to retain the flavours when
cooking meat, such as prime beef topside. Place a solid
container underneath to catch the juices.
You can use these to make a gravy or freeze them for later
use.
Meat
11
Page: 11
Boiling fowl, pork rind, meat, ribs and meat bones can all be
used to make delicious stock. Place the meat together with
some mixed vegetables in a solid cooking container and add
cold water. Cook at 100 °C for 60 to 90 minutes. The longer
the cooking duration, the stronger the stock.
Settings
The durations given in the charts are guidelines only. We
recommend selecting the shorter cooking duration quoted. If
food is not cooked sufficiently after the shorter time it can be
put back in the oven and cooked some more.
Temperature in
°C
Duration in
minutes
Flank 100 60 - 70
Knuckle 100 90 - 95
Chicken breast fillet 100 8 - 10
Veal cutlets 100 3 - 4
Gammon steaks 100 6 - 8
Lamb stew 100 12 - 16
Turkey roulade 100 12 - 15
Turkey escalopes 100 4 - 6
Poularde/Spring
chicken
100 50 - 60
Beef stew 100 40 - 50
Boiling fowl 100 50 - 60
Prime beef topside 100 60 - 100
Meat
12
Page: 12
Fresh fish
Prepare fresh fish in the usual way, i.e. clean, gut and fillet.
Frozen fish
Defrost frozen fish (see "Defrosting").
Preparation
Add some lemon or lime juice to fish before cooking. The
citric acid helps the flesh stay firm.
It is not necessary to season fish when cooking with steam as
this method retains the minerals which give the fish its unique
flavour.
Cooking container
Any.
If using a perforated container, grease it first.
Shelf level
When cooking fish in a perforated container at the same time
as cooking other types of food in other containers, place the
condensate tray directly underneath the container with the
fish to catch any liquid and so avoid any transfer of flavour to
other food.
Temperature
85 °C
For gently cooking delicate types of fish, such as sole.
100 °C
For cooking firmer types of fish, e.g. cod and salmon.
Also for cooking fish in sauce or stock.
Fish
13
Page: 13
Cooking duration
The cooking duration depends on the thickness and the
texture of the fish, and not on the weight. The thicker the fish,
the longer the cooking duration. A 3 cm thick piece of fish
weighing 500 g will take longer to cook than a 2 cm thick
piece of fish weighing 500 g.
The longer fish cooks, the firmer its flesh will become. Use the
cooking durations given in the chart.
If you find that the fish is not cooked sufficiently, only cook it
for a few minutes more.
When cooking fish in sauce or stock, we recommend that you
increase the cooking duration quoted by a few minutes.
Useful tips
Adding herbs and spices, such as dill, will help bring out the
full flavour of the fish.
Cook large fish in the swimming position. To help maintain the
structure of the fish, place a small cup or similar upside down
in the cooking container, and arrange the fish belly side down
over the cup.
You can use any fish scraps, e.g. fish heads, bones, tails etc
to make a fish stock. Place the fish scraps together with
some mixed vegetables in a solid cooking container and add
cold water. Cook at 100 °C for 60 to 90 minutes. The longer
the cooking duration, the stronger the stock.
Blue fish is fish which is cooked in water and vinegar. It is
important not to damage the skin of the fish. This method is
suitable for cooking carp, trout, tench, eel and salmon.
Fish
14
Page: 14
Settings
The cooking durations given in the chart are guidelines for fresh fish. We
recommend selecting the shorter cooking duration quoted. If food is not cooked
sufficiently after the shorter time it can be put back in the oven and cooked some
more.
Temperature in °C Duration in minutes
Eel 100 5 - 7
Perch fillet 85 6 - 8
Seabream fillet 85 3 - 5
Coral cod, whole 85 15 - 20
Trout, 250 g 90 10 - 12
Shark steak 90 5 - 7
Halibut fillet 85 3 - 5
Atlantic cod fillet 100 4 - 6
Carp, 1.5 kg 100 18 - 25
Salmon fillet 100 4 - 8
Salmon trout 100 13 - 15
Pangasius fillet 85 3 - 5
Rose fish fillet 100 6 - 8
Haddock fillet 100 6 - 8
Plaice fillet 85 5 - 7
Monk fish fillet 85 8 - 10
Sole fillet 85 2 - 3
Turbot fillet 85 3 - 5
Tuna steak 100 3 - 5
Nile perch fillet 100 4 - 8
Pikeperch fillet 85 5 - 7
Fish
15
Page: 15
Shellfish
Preparation
Defrost frozen shellfish before cooking with steam.
Peel, remove and discard the intestines, and then wash the
shellfish.
Cooking container
Any.
If using a perforated container, grease it first.
Cooking duration
The longer shellfish are cooked, the tougher they become.
Follow the cooking durations given in the chart.
When cooking shellfish in sauce or stock, we recommend that
you increase the cooking duration quoted by a few minutes.
Settings
Temperature in
°C
Duration in
minutes
Crevettes 90 3
Prawns 90 3
King Prawns 90 4
Small shrimps 90 3
Crayfish tails 95 10 - 15
Large shrimps 90 3
Other foods
16
Page: 16
Mussels
Fresh mussels
,Only cook mussels which are closed.
N.B. Do not eat mussels which have not opened after
being cooked. Danger of food poisoning.
Steep fresh mussels in water for a few hours before cooking
to rinse out any sand. Then scrub them thoroughly to clean
them.
Frozen muscles
Defrost frozen mussels before cooking.
Cooking duration
The longer mussels are cooked, the tougher they become.
Follow the cooking durations given in the chart.
Settings
Temperature in
°C
Duration in
minutes
Barnacles 100 2
Cockles 100 2
Bearded mussels 100 12
Pilgrim scallops 90 5
Razor clams 100 2 - 4
Venus mussels 100 4
Other foods
17
Page: 17
Rice
Rice swells when cooked and needs to be cooked in liquid.
The proportion of rice to liquid will vary depending on the
type of rice.
The rice absorbs all the liquid and so none of the nutrients
are lost.
Settings
Ratio
Rice : Liquid
Temperature in
°C
Duration in
minutes
Basmati rice 1 : 1 100 15
Parboiled rice 1 : 1 100 20
Round grain
rice
1 : 2 100 25
Brown rice 1 : 1.5 100 35 - 40
Wild rice 1 : 1 100 35 - 40
Other foods
18
Page: 18
Pasta
Dry pasta
Dry pasta swells when it is cooked and needs to be cooked
in liquid. The liquid must cover the pasta. Using hot liquid
gives better results.
Settings for dry pasta
Reduce the cooking time recommended on the packaging by
about 1/
3 as the pasta will start to swell during the heating up
time.
Fresh pasta
Fresh pasta, such as you can buy from the supermarket
chilled counter, does not need to absorb water. Cook fresh
pasta in a perforated container.
Separate any pieces of pasta which have stuck together and
spread them out in the cooking container.
Settings for fresh pasta
Temperature in °C Duration in minutes
Gnocchi 100 2
Ravioli 100 2
Tortellini 100 2
Other foods
19
Page: 19
Dumplings
Ready made boil-in-the-bag dumplings need to be well
covered with water as otherwise they can fall apart. This is
because even although they have been soaked in water
beforehand they will not absorb enough moisture.
Cook fresh dumplings in a greased, perforated container.
Settings
Temperature in
°C
Duration in
minutes
Yeast dumplings 100 12 - 15
Boil-in-the-bag potato
dumplings
100 15 - 18
Boil-in-the-bag bread
dumplings
100 15 - 18
Other foods
20
Page: 20
Grains
Grain swells during cooking and needs to be cooked in
liquid. The proportion of grain to liquid will vary depending on
the type of grain.
Grain can be cooked whole or cracked.
Settings
Ratio
Grain : Liquid
Temperature in
°C
Duration in
minutes
Amaranth 1 : 2 100 40
Bulgur 1 : 1 100 10
Green spelt,
cracked
1 : 1 100 10
Green spelt, whole 1 : 1 100 16 - 18
Oats, whole 1 : 1 100 16 - 18
Oats, cracked 1 : 1 100 10
Millet, whole 1 : 1 100 30 - 35
Polenta 1 : 3 100 10
Quinoa 1 : 2 100 10
Rye, whole 1 : 1 100 30 - 35
Rye, cracked 1 : 1 100 10
Wheat, whole 1 : 1 100 20 - 25
Wheat, cracked 1 : 1 100 10
Other foods
21
Page: 21
Dried pulses
Pulses swell during cooking and need to be cooked in liquid.
The ratio of pulses to liquid should be 1:3.
Soak pulses for at least 10 hours in cold water before
cooking. Soaking makes pulses more digestible and shortens
the cooking duration required.
Exception: Lentils do not need to be soaked before cooking.
Settings
Temperature Duration in minutes
in °C Pre-soaked Not pre-soaked
Beans
Borlotti beans 100 55 110
Kidney beans 100 55 110
Black beans 100 60 120
Pinto beans 100 60 120
Haricot beans 100 25 - 30 60
Lentils
Brown lentils 100 - 15 - 20
Red lentils 100 - 8
Peas
Yellow split peas 100 20 - 40 40 - 80
Green peas, shelled 100 20 - 25 40 - 80
Other foods
22
Page: 22
Hen's eggs
Use a perforated container to prepare boiled eggs in the
steam oven.
The eggs do not need to be pierced before cooking as they
are gradually warmed during the heating up phase and so do
not burst when they are cooked with steam.
Plunge the eggs into cold water after cooking to stop them
from continuing to cook.
When using a solid container for preparing egg dishes,
remember to grease it first.
Settings
Temperature in
°C
Duration in
minutes
Eggs medium
size, soft boiled
100 3 - 4
Eggs medium
size, medium
boiled
100 5 - 6
Eggs medium
size, hard boiled
100 8 - 10
Other foods
23
Page: 23
Fruit
Cook delicate types of fruit, the skin of which burst easily
(e.g. apricots), at 90 °C only.
Cook fruit in a solid container so that none of the juice is lost.
If you wish to cook fruit in a perforated container, place a
solid container directly underneath it to collect the juice.
Tip
You can use the juice which has collected in the solid
container to make a glaze for a fruit flan.
Settings
Temperature in
°C
Duration in
minutes
Apricot halves 90 2 - 4
Apple pieces 100 3 - 5
Pear chunks 100 3 - 5
Cherries 90 2 - 4
Plums 100 2 - 4
Rhubarb 100 1 - 3
Sour cherries 90 2 - 4
Gooseberries 90 2 - 4
Other foods
24
Page: 24
You can use the steam oven to cook a whole meal containing
foods which have different cooking durations, e.g. fish fillet
with rice and broccoli. The food which has the longest
cooking duration is placed in the steam oven first and then
each subsequent dish is placed in the oven at the
appropriate time so that the whole meal is ready at the same
time.
Shelf level
When cooking fish or food with a distinctive colour (e.g.
beetroot) in a perforated container, place the condensate tray
directly underneath the container to avoid any transfer of
flavour or colour to other food.
Temperature
Whole meals should be cooked at a temperature of 100 °C as
this is the temperature required to cook the majority of foods.
Do not cook a whole meal at the lowest temperature when
different temperatures are required for different types of food,
e.g. 85 °C for seabream and 100 °C for potatoes.
If the recommended cooking temperature for the food is
85 °C for example, try cooking it at 100 °C and testing the
result. Some delicate types of fish with a soft structure, e.g.
sole and plaice will become very firm when cooked at 100 °C.
Cooking duration
If you are increasing the recommended temperature, shorten
the cooking duration by approx. 1
/3.
Menu cooking
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Example
Rice 20 minutes
Fish fillet 6 minutes
Broccoli 4 minutes
20 minutes - 6 minutes = 14 minutes
(1st cooking duration: rice)
6 minutes - 4 minutes = 2 minutes
(2nd cooking duration: fish fillet)
Remaining time = 4 minutes
(3rd cooking duration: broccoli)
Duration 20 min - rice
6 min - fish fillet
4 min -
broccoli
Setting 14 min 2 min 4 min
^ Place the rice in the oven first.
^ Set the first cooking duration: 14 minutes.
^ After 14 minutes, place the fish in the oven.
^ Set the second cooking duration: 2 minutes.
^ After 2 minutes, place the broccoli in the oven.
^ Set the third cooking duration: 4 minutes.
Menu cooking
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It is much quicker to defrost items in the steam oven than at
room temperature.
Temperature
60 °C is the best temperature for defrosting.
Exceptions: 50 °C for minced meat and game, 100 °C for
bread and cakes.
Before and after defrosting
Remove all packaging before defrosting.
Exceptions:
Leave bread, biscuits and cakes in their packaging as
otherwise they will absorb moisture and become soft.
Allow defrosted food to stand at room temperature after
removing it from the oven. The standing time is necessary to
allow the warmth to reach the core of the food from the
outside.
Cooking container/rack
Use the rack with the condensate tray underneath it when
defrosting food which will drip, such as poultry. This way food
will not be lying in defrosted liquid.
,It is particulary important to observe food hygiene
rules when defrosting poultry. Do not use the liquid from
defrosted poultry. Pour it away and wash the tray, the sink
and your hands. Danger of salmonella poisoning.
Food which does not drip can be placed on the rack, in a
cooking container or in a dish.
Useful tips
Fish does not need to be fully defrosted before cooking.
Defrost so that the surface is sufficiently thawed to take herbs
and seasoning. Depending on the thickness of the fish,
2 - 5 minutes should be enough.
When defrosting food which has frozen together, e.g. berries,
chops, fish fillets etc. separate it about half-way through the
defrosting time.
Do not refreeze food once it has thawed.
Defrost frozen pre-cooked meals according to the
manufacturer's instructions.
Defrosting
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Food to be
defrosted
Weight
in g
Temperature
in °C
Defrosting
duration
in minutes
Standing time
in minutes
Dairy products
Cheese slices 125 60 15 10
Quark 250 60 20 - 25 10 - 15
Cream 250 60 20 - 25 10 - 15
Soft cheese 100 60 15 10 - 15
Fruit
Apple sauce 250 60 20 - 25 10 - 15
Apple pieces 250 60 20 - 25 10 - 15
Apricots 500 60 25 - 28 15 - 20
Strawberries 300 60 8 - 10 10 - 12
Raspberries/
Blackcurrants
300 60 8 10 - 12
Cherries 150 60 15 10 - 15
Peaches 500 60 25 - 28 15 - 20
Plums 250 60 20 - 25 10 - 15
Gooseberries 250 60 20 - 22 10 - 15
Vegetables
Frozen in a block 300 60 20 - 25 10 - 15
Fish
Trout 500 60 15 - 18 10 - 15
Lobster 300 60 25 - 30 10 - 15
Small shrimps 300 60 4 - 6 5
Defrosting
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Food to be
defrosted
Weight
in g
Temperature
in °C
Defrosting
duration
in minutes
Standing time
in minutes
Meat
Meat slices - 60 8 - 10 15 - 20
Minced meat 250 50 15 - 20 10 - 15
Minced meat 500 50 20 - 30 10 - 15
Goulash 500 60 30 - 40 10 - 15
Goulash 1000 60 50 - 60 10 - 15
Liver 250 60 20 - 25 10 - 15
Saddle of hare 500 50 30 - 40 15 - 15
Roebuck saddle 1000 50 40 - 50 10 - 15
Cutlets / chops /
sausages
800 60 25 - 35 15 - 20
Poultry
Chicken 1000 60 40 15 - 20
Chicken thighs 150 60 20 - 25 10 - 15
Chicken escalopes 500 60 25 - 30 10 - 15
Turkey drumsticks 500 60 40 - 45 10 - 15
Baked goods
Puff pastries/
yeast buns
60 10 - 12 10 - 15
Cakes/biscuits 400 60 15 10 - 15
Bread/rolls
Bread rolls 100 6 - 7 1 - 2
Rye bread, sliced 250 100 15 15
Wholegrain bread,
sliced
250 100 15 - 20 10 - 15
White bread, sliced 150 100 10 - 15 10 - 15
Defrosting
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The steam oven is very effective at reheating food gently,
without drying it out or cooking it further. The food will reheat
evenly and does not need to be stirred during the reheating
process.
You can reheat individual dishes or plated meals which have
been prepared previously (e.g. meat, vegetables and
potatoes).
Suitable containers
Small quantities can be reheated on a plate, larger quantities
should be placed in a cooking container.
Duration
The number of plates or containers has no bearing on the
cooking duration.
The cooking durations listed in the chart relate to an average
portion per plate/container. Increase the cooking duration for
larger quantities.
Useful tips
Compact items, such as stuffed peppers or roulades, should
be cut in half.
Reheat
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Procedure
^ Cover the food with a deep plate, a lid, or with clingfilm that
is resistant to temperatures up to 100 °C and to steam.
^ Then place the plate on the rack in the oven.
Settings
Temperature in
°C
Duration in
minutes
Frankfurters 90 2 - 4
Casserole 100 5 - 6
Meat 100 4 - 5
Pork sausages 90 7 - 10
Poultry 100 4 - 5
Vegetables 100 2 - 3
Soup 100 3 - 4
Plated meals 100 3 - 4
Veal sausages 90 5 - 7
Reheat
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Only use unblemished, fresh produce which is in good
condition for bottling.
Glass jars
Use clean glass jars and accessories and check them for any
defects. Glass jars with twist off lids or glass lids with a
rubber seal are suitable.
Make sure that all the glass jars are the same size so that
bottling is carried out evenly.
After you have filled the jars with the bottled produce, clean
the glass rims with a clean cloth and hot water and then seal
the jars.
Fruit
Sort fruit carefully, rinse it briefly but thoroughly and allow it to
drain. Take great care when cleaning soft fruit as it is very
delicate and squashes easily.
Remove any peel, stalks, cores or stones.
Cut up large fruit. For example, cut apples into slices.
If you are bottling fruit with stones (e.g. plums, apricots)
without removing the stones, pierce the fruit several times
with a fork or wooden screwer as otherwise it will burst.
Vegetables
Rinse, clean and cut up vegetables.
Green vegetables should be blanched before bottling to help
them retain their colour (see "Blanching").
Fill volume
Fill the glass jars with produce up to a maximum of 3 cm
below the rim. Do not pack it down as this will damage the
cell walls of the produce. Tap the jar gently onto a cloth to
help distribute the contents evenly.
Fill the jars with liquid. The produce must be completely
covered.
Use a sugar solution for fruit and a salt or vinegar solution for
vegetables.
Bottling
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Useful tips
Make use of residual heat by leaving the jars in the oven for
30 minutes after it has switched off.
Then cover the jars with a cloth and allow to cool for approx.
24 hours.
Procedure
^ Place the rack on the lowest shelf level.
^ Place the jars on the rack (all the same size). Ensure that
they do not touch one another.
Settings
Produce Temperature in
°C
Duration in
minutes*
Fruit
Apples 90 50
Apple sauce 90 65
Red/Blackcurrants 80 50
Gooseberries 80 55
Fruit with stones 85 55
Vegetables
Beans 100 120
Gherkins 90 55
* The times quoted are for 1.0 litre jars. If using 0.5 litre jars
reduce the duration by about 15 minutes. If using 0.25 litre
jars reduce the duration by about 20 minutes.
Bottling
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You can use the steam oven to extract juices from fruit, such
as soft berries and cherries.
It is best to use overripe fruit, as the riper the fruit the greater
the quantity of juice produced. Very ripe fruit will also
produce a more intense flavour.
Preparation
Sort and clean the fruit. Cut out any blemishes.
Remove the stalks from grapes and morello cherries as these
are bitter. The stalks do not need to be removed from
strawberries, raspberries etc.
Useful tips
Try experimenting with mild and tart flavours, for example,
mix apples with elderberries.
Adding sugar will increase the quantity of juice produced and
improve the flavour. Sprinkle the fruit with sugar and leave to
absorb for a few hours before juicing. For sweet fruit add
100 - 150 g sugar, and for more tart fruit 150 - 200 g sugar
per kilo of fruit.
If you wish to bottle the juice rather than consume it straight
away, pour it whilst hot into hot, sterilised bottles up to the
rim, and then seal immediately with sterilised tops.
Procedure
^ Put the prepared fruit (cleaned, washed, chopped etc.) into
a perforated cooking container.
^ Place a solid container or the condensate tray underneath
to catch the juice.
Settings
Temperature: 100 °C
Duration: 40-70 minutes
Extracting juice with steam
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Preparing yoghurt
To prepare yoghurt you will need 100 g fresh yoghurt (with
live culture) an 1 litre of milk.
The yoghurt and milk should have the same percentage fat.
You can use either unchilled long-life milk or fresh milk.
If using fresh milk it should first be heated up to 90 °C (do not
boil it) and then left to cool.
Procedure
^ Mix 100 g yoghurt with 1 litre of milk.
^ Pour the mixture into portion sized glass jars or special
yoghurt jars. Seal the jars.
^ Place the sealed jars in a cooking container or on the rack.
Ensure that they do not touch one another.
Useful tips
How well home prepared yoghurt sets will depend on the
consistency of the yoghurt used to prepare it.
Fresh milk will give a better set than long-life milk.
The yoghurt will not achieve its maximum set until it has been
thoroughly chilled.
You can buy yoghurt jars from specialist cook shops.
Settings
Temperatur: 40 °C
Duration: 5:00 hours
Special programmes
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Proving dough
Procedure
^ Prepare the dough according to the recipe.
^ Place a covered bowl on the rack.
Settings
Temperature: 40 °C
Duration: according to recipe
Melting gelatine
Procedure
^ Gelatine leaves: Completely cover the gelatine leaves with
cold water and leave to soak for 5 minutes. The gelatine
leaves have to be fully covered with water. Remove the
gelatine leaves from the bowl and squeeze them out.
Empty the bowl. Place the squeezed gelatine leaves back
in the bowl.
^ Gelatine powder: Place the gelatine powder in a bowl and
add water according to the instructions on the packaging.
^ Cover the bowl and place on the rack.
Settings
Temperature: 90 °C
Duration: 1 minute
Special programmes
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Melting chocolate
You can use the steam oven for melting any type of
chocolate.
Procedure
^ Break the chocolate into small pieces.
^ Place large quantities in a solid container and small
quantites in a cup or a dish.
^ Cover the container or the dish with temperature (up to
100 °C) and hot steam resistant clingfilm or a lid.
^ Stir large quantities once during cooking.
Settings
Temperature: 90 °C
Duration: 10 minutes
Special programmes
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Skinning vegetables and fruit
Procedure
^ Cut a cross in the top of tomatoes, nectarines etc. This will
allow the skin to be removed more easily.
^ Place the fruit/vegetables in a perforated container.
^ To blanch almonds, it is important to plunge them into cold
water as soon as they are taken out of the oven as
otherwise the skin cannot be removed.
Settings
Produce Temperature in
°C
Duration in
minutes
Apricots 100 1
Almonds 100 1
Nectarines 100 1
Capsicum 100 4
Peaches 100 1
Tomatoes 100 2
Special programmes
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Apple storage
You can treat homegrown apples in the steam oven to
increase the length of time you can store them for. Once
treated, the apples will keep for 5 to 6 months when stored in
a dry, cool and well-ventilated place. This method is only
suitable for apples and not for other types of fruit.
Settings
Temperature: 50 °C
Duration: 5 minutes
Blanching
Blanch fruit and vegetable before freezing them. Blanching
helps maintain the quality of the produce when it is frozen.
Blanching vegetables also helps them retain their original
colour.
Procedure
^ Put the prepared vegetables/fruit (cleaned, washed,
chopped etc.) into a perforated cooking container.
^ Once blanched, plunge the vegetables/fruit into ice cold
water to cool them down quickly. Drain them well.
Settings
Temperature: 100 °C
Duration: 1 - 2 minutes
Special programmes
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Steaming onions
Steaming means cooking the onions in their own juices, with
the addition of a little fat if necessary.
Procedure
^ Cut the onions up into small pieces and place them in a
solid cooking container with a little butter.
^ Cover the container or the dish with temperature (up to
100 °C) and hot steam resistant clingfilm or a lid.
Settings
Temperature: 100 °C
Duration: 4 minutes
Bacon
The bacon does not brown.
Procedure
^ Place the bacon (diced or rashers) in a solid cooking
container.
^ Cover the container with temperature (up to 100 °C) and
hot steam resistant clingfilm or a lid.
Settings
Temperature: 100 °C
Duration: 4 minutes
Special programmes
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Disinfecting containers
The steam oven will disinfect baby bottles and other
containers so that at the end of the programme they are as
germ free as they would have been if boiled. Check
beforehand that all parts, teats etc. are declared by the
manufacturer to be heat resistant to 100 °C and also that they
can withstand hot steam.
All parts of the bottles must be completely dry before they are
reassembled to keep them germ free.
Procedure
^ Place the rack on the lowest shelf level.
^ Dismantle, clean and thoroughly rinse baby bottles.
Place the individual parts on the rack, ensuring that they do
not touch one another (on their sides or with the opening
facing downwards) to allow hot steam to reach them from
all sides.
Settings
Temperature: 100 °C
Duration: 15 minutes
Heating flannels
Procedure
^ Moisten flannels and then roll them up.
^ Place them beside one another in a perforated cooking
container.
Settings
Temperature: 70 °C
Duration: 2 minutes
Special programmes
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Decrystallising honey
Procedure
^ Loosen the lid and place the jar of honey in a perforated
cooking container or on the rack.
^ Stir the honey once during the cooking procedure.
Settings
Temperature: 60 °C
Duration: 90 minutes (depending on the size of jar or the
amount of honey in the jar)
Special programmes
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Question & answers

Problem with DG 5061 steam oven , can' t be used as it comes up with Process stopped -repeat descaling programme I have already descaled twice so now I want to access service mode so I can use oven again. How can I access the service mode?

Published on 1 year ago by Mary

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